Ariodante at Drottningholm, round 2

Not having yet enough, we returned for round two last night. The weather has been so gorgeous here we decided to walk across the bridge to enjoy the scenery and breeze instead of being snuffed in the bus. This post is not really a post, just more random thoughts on horns, Ginevra, Ariodante, the staging, and perhaps the meaning of “life” 🙂 .


The first great news is of the announcement of a radio broadcast, i believe on 17/Aug. And more importantly, the radio bus was here! which means the broadcast will be of last night performance, unless they recorded twice to gauge the sound? With all the mics set up (at the front, as well as mounted on nearly all instruments in the pit) everyone brought their A-game. To our relief, the row just in front was empty of 2 seats, and with us sitting behind some really tall Swedes, we decisively upgraded just as the ushers closed the doors. And look who we found right opposite ❤ (more later)..

I can’t say I understand more the staging. If anything, I now know where to put my focus, and on this day it was to see if I could understand Ariodante’s story better as well as that of Dalinda’s. I can’t tell if it’s the switching of side that resulted in us hearing Ann Hallenberg’s better (?), but it was a very clear case that she was in top form. Hearing her really made me appreciate how wonderful a human voice can be, as well as marvel what it (she) can do.
I’m no closer to figuring out what/who Ariodante is, but made a decision last night that I don’t care. With that level of pulsative joy and argony being expressed live, let us live and enjoy life! And as a lover of dancing, i confess all dancers were completely overlooked last night when Ariodante and/or Ginevra were on stage! Beside their symbolic oppression in association with Ginevra, I find them superfluous and at times a distraction. But why distraction in the first place? Because again we do not understand the staging very well, except again when it comes to Ginevra. With the radio mic placed up front, i find any flow/hint to the staging were squashed as often the singers, most noticeably the male singers, planted in front and sang statically, and a lot of ornamentations were added at the expense of drama.

No new info can be extracted for Dalinda’s storyline either (from me). My original theory of the staging with puppets being pulled around (by Polinesso as Degghi observed) in the first Act.. and supposedly gone by the 3rd when everyone was bare.. was smashed.. because Dalinda was still in her jerky motion all through 2nd and 3rd Acts. Thus it becomes a little bit of a “concert” performance. AHHH, i think i might have gotten it! especially now that I recall seeing Dalinda, after singing the duet with Lurcanio, simply got up and walked out the door where the bright light entered: The story is sort of like in that movie “Dark City” (in case you haven’t seen, one of my favs) , where humans were being pulled on strings by the aliens who had invaded the earth and used them (humans) for memory experiment to understand certain level of emotions they can not achieve. The entire movie is in the dark as each day humans’ memory were swapped and allowed to wake up only at night to interact with total strangers who were suddenly now their family members.. and in the final scene, after a battle and conscience discussion, a ray of light finally emerged on the horizon and with it humans can be themselves again:

In this setting, even those black-body dancers can be put into context, as they were indeed the one pulling strings, and embedded within them the “made up story” where humans would further inflict pains among themselves, with Ginevra being the chosen victim? Here Ariodante could be seen as traveling somewhat in “parallel” to Ginevra existence (hence they never touched) , with some close encounters (their wonderful duets) and supposed pains felt by Ariodante through “Scherza infida”? Anyhow, I’m definitely thinking a bit too much into this, as you can clearly see how confused we are with this staging..

In any case, I can now tell you definitively which section in the opera has horn in it! WONDERFUL horns. The poor king and his famous “Voli colla sua la tromba” was in no contest as the horns had my/our FULL attention. Suuuuuuuuuch a lazy (in the best complimentary way) sound, the kind you feel warm in the heart and know it can never overwhelm your hearing except to compliment ❤ ❤ ❤ . If you don't know how serious the 2nd Act is yet, now you do: Händel removed all horns until the 3rd Act. They joined in again both to signify the triumph of Ginevra (when she is finally awaken and let out), as well as complimenting the final chorus, alternating between the dual voices of Ginevra and Ariodante and the rest.

Finally, let us (me) discuss more about Ginevra and her music! Ever since the first live performance I heard in London a couple years ago, I've gained an appreciation for the music (it really requires an investigation because on sound alone you might exclaim “oh no, not another sad section!”). This has allowed me to fully hear how Roberta Mameli brought it to life. I must repeat again the way she delivers the recitative gives me such a tremendous joy of feeling connected to the music and rhythm. As you might have known, I don't speak many other languages typically sung in operas. and can't read music. What this means is apparently i can "hear" what is communicated only via the weighting and shaping of the musical phrasing rather than perfectly pronounced words in whichever language. And it is truly a simple joy of being able to hear these types of phrasings, as they connect the dots and allow you to understand the characters without wrestling for 5000 words trying to figure out what they are singing about.. Mixing with this was her commitment to the acting to make Ginevra's story very believable: for nearly 30 min starting with her first appearance in Act 2 trapped amongst wire and dark pulling hands and hunched down behind the curtain fighting to launch forward (away from puppet pulling?), to the end of the delirium (end of Act 2, end of fighting with the dark force in bed), it was SERIOUS wrestling! We were exhausted just from watching (and curious how she managed the physical demand). And in between delivering "Il mio crudel martoro" with full force? FULL OF RESPECT! (Händel really made it hard for the sopranos here, with the countless "morte, dove sei tu" (at least 10x?? I think even more)..

Anyhow, I'd like to cap this endless rambling off by offering Ginevra's last two short arias (her first three were serious dark mood). I liked them a lot also for their change of pace. Here is the 2nd to last which, as she struggled in isolation (mentally and physically), the mood change gives her an outlet with the full orchestra (vicious violin) in behind in support!

Così mi lascia il padre? Oh cor, stà forte!
il minor de’ miei mali è sol la morte.

Sì, morrò; ma l’onor mio meco, oh! Dio!
Morir dovrà? Giusto Ciel, deh, pietà
del reggio onor!

And the last one, truly sorrowful recit 😥 , followed by triumphant horns (wonderful exchange of smile with our horn players as they stood up for this!)

Da dubbia infausta sorte,
quanto pender degg’io
incerta tra la vita, e tra la morte, senza conforto,
abbandonata e sola?
chi mi soccorre, oh Dei! chi mi consola?

Manca, oh Dei! la mia costanza,
mentre ha fine il mio dolor!
Nè mi resta la speranza di morir…

So, that’s a wrap to this session of rambling! Below is the quite-up-close curtain call. I might not get to the next, but if i do, we might explore Ginevra’s music some more! The rain has stopped, the sun has come out, it’s time to explore Stockholm again! Until next time.

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