music for the night

Monteverdi “Voglio di vita uscir” (I want to depart this life)

Voglio di vita uscir, voglio che cadano
Quest’ossa in polve e queste membra in cenere,
E che i singulti miei tra l’ombre vadano,
Già che quel piè ch’ingemma l’herbe tenere
Sempre fugge da me, ne lo trattengono
I lacci, ohimè, del bel fanciul di Venere.

Vo che gl’abissi il mio cordoglio vedano,
E l’aspro mio martir le furie piangano,
E che i dannati al mio tormento cedano.
A Dio crudel, gl’orgogli tuoi rimangano
A incrudelir con gl’altri. A te rinuncio,
Né vo’ più che mie speme in te si frangano.

S’apre la tomba, il mio morir t’annuncio.
Una lagrima spargi, et alfin donami
Di tua tarda pietade un solo nuncio,
E s’amando t’offesi, homai perdonami.

I want to depart this life, I want my bones
to fall into dust, and my limbs into ashes,
and my sobs to disappear among the shadows,
since those feet, which adorn the tender grasses,
are always fleeing from me; nor are they restrained,
alas, by the bonds of the lovely son of Venus.

I want the depths of hell to see my sorrow,
and the Furies to weep for my harsh agony,
and the damned to acknowledge my torment.
Farewell, cruel one, let your pride remain
to torture others; I renounce you!
I no longer want you to dash my hopes to pieces.

The tomb opens: my death is at hand.
Shed but one tear, and at the last give me
a single sign of your pity (now too late);
and if my love has offended you, forgive me now!

(now i’m hoping to eventually get a clip of her singing “lasciatemi morire” …)


more monteverdi snippet

ok, so i’ve just found out that more people are now taping “live” S.Mingardo’s performances, yay. Wish this thing below is in full.. but snippet is what we’ll settle for now. There’s also this other full thing which I’ve already posted in some comment section, but it never hurts to share again the goodie, and along with it a lovely write up (based on translation).

(Note the video below: the volume is by default mute, you just have to switch it on. also on mobile the vid doesn’t show up, so it’s now linked to the picture above.)

il ritorno d’Ulisse, round 2

It has been well documented chez thadieu that often the 2nd round is better than the first, especially with singers who are in their elements. Prior to tonight’s performance it was brought to my attention that a certain critic writing for some big name newspaper in Hamburg only spent the last paragraph of a long review with first mentions of Sara Mingardo on way to writing she was not heard well*. Granted that three of us were at the theater on the opening night and complaining about the loud harpsichord.. yet all heard her very well, I was quite puzzled to hear this report (so was Dehggi). Especially because we were distributed in the hall enough to avoid potential bias due to preferential seatings. Why do I start a report on such a negative note? Because, by the end of this evening’s performance, I’m pretty sure whoever the critic was likely is in need of an ear- and reality-check**.

This report, I’m afraid, might turn into a big Sara Mingardo’s post. The opera of course started out with the fragile human being tormented by the gods and goddesses. Christophe Dumaux had some very delicate phrasings. Soon though, the evening took a quiet and somber turn as drums sprinkled, theorbos lightly strummed, to Penelope staged at center in dark dress, dark glasses, dark veil. Besides the timeless sweeping by Ericlea, all movements ceased. Then a dark voice rose. Personally, I find this entrance significantly more effective when it is done in a more quiet and evolving manner than full-on lament. And that’s what we had tonight. sprinkles of theorbos, and Sara Mingardo phrasing (pining) Monteverdi. Time truly stopped. It was a true marvel hearing how the mood evolves with her, as if she’s doing it on the fly, based on how she/Penelope felt at each evolving moment. Only occasionally i realized “oh, she’s approached the chair here, like last time”, or “oh, she’s throwing the chair there” . Even the simple moment of throwing the chair was spontaneous: Penelope grabbing on, twisting fingers as she built up the tension in the phrasing, then snapped, with the bouncing echo on the floor. The running away from the center, approaching the edge, hand gestures, leaning onto Ericlea, sitting down rocking sadly and melancholically, with a soft painful smile, to

Torna il tranquillo al mare,
torna il zeffiro al prato,
l’aurora mentre al sol fa dolce invito
a un ritorno del dì che è pria partito.

😥 .

And the soft pianissimo we were hoping to hear last Sunday? In full display; trailing and ascending ever so slightly as Penelope drifted into the background to the dancing. sniff. It was that kind of an evening. Yours truly was a bit shaken. But the opera does not end with Penelope’s lament. One should not miss it. But if somehow one accidentally did, it’s still completely worth the effort simply to hear the rest of her phrasing. I have it worked out that this is what she does, and if this works for you, it will never go wrong 🙂 . To the critic who apparently couldn’t hear her, i can rebuff today, from row 8, she was heard extremely well. And judging by the loud screams she received during curtain call, the rest of the theater also heard her well.
Interestingly she was exceptionally well heard when standing on the take singing down to us. As far as beam-story goes, that might have been it! I had all her music mentally marked down in head through the evening, every movements now registered, as if to create a long-lasting memory when i replay the radio broadcast.

A final note on Penelope then, before I might proceed to talk about other singers (or not.. it’s getting late and i have to get up at 4am…) The final collapse. My heart did fully dropped, let out an audible gasp with simultaneous jolt. Even when knowing a collapse was coming i was taken by complete surprise when she did. Something about the so precise moment and yet unpredictable. And with it the cascading spill of emotion, to the soft and yet still slightly pained smile

Gli augelletti, cantando,
i rivi mormorando or si rallegrino!


I regret not having another chance to hear her in this production. it’s currently pouring rain outside and i hope she is not catching a cold from it! because if you’re in town and want to hear one of the world’s best contraltos breathing Monteverdi, you should go hear her live. I have already discussed the orchestra sparingly elsewhere and just wanted to add today, either they had reduced volume greatly during her singing, or perhaps sitting in the floor section blocked out the harpsichord, but i think it (the harpsichord) has toned down significantly.. not sure if this is a welcome trend or that it might pick up again during the weekend.. Also I’m still working my way through Vaclav Luks’s conducting. Personally I prefer a little bit more “rhythm” / pace change to help things flow a tiny bit more musically. Yes yes i know this is Monteverdi, but the continuous similarities can even make this semi hard-core Monteverdi fan flagged at time.. Also, there’s still something about their “thick” accompany that I’m still trying to wrap my head around.. and a tiny note that i prefer Ian Bostridge’s way of phrasing significantly more than Kurt Streit’s.

Edit: curtain call:

-ps anotehr curtain call coming at some point…
* i can’t voucher yet since it was translatedly summarized to me, and translation can also be rather subjective as it can also highlight the person’s personal intake..
** or rather, as Dehggi and Agathe put it, get the ears trained on contraltos.

il ritorno d’Ulisse in Hamburg

©Monika Rittershaus

warming greetings from Hamburg! The WS vehicle, which Purity envisioned 8 years ago to follow mezzos (and contraltos) around Europe finally materialized as Agathe, thadieu, and Dehggi all piled into to a small 4-wheel device heading for Sara Mingardo.

the Mingardo soundtrack for the WS road

The anticipation was very high, given that the Hamburger Staatsoper withheld any rehearsal photos the entire week prior and we all arrived with heart-thumping worries of an announcement of a replacement. Even the conductor walking out was giving Agathe a heart-dropping moment, same worrying about more last minute announcement :-). But all was well, Sara Mingardo was listed, onstage right from the first scene. Not sure if Agathe recognized her in the ensemble, but of course I did, and so should Dehggi one floor higher up on our opposite side.

Monteverdi’s Il ritorno d’Ulisse in patria

Hamburg 29/Oct/2017
Sara Mingardo: Penelope

Kurt Streit: Ulisse
Katja Pieweck: Ericlea
Dorottya Láng: Minerva
Dovlet Nurgeldiyev: Telemaco
Christophe Dumaux: L’umana fragilità / Anfinomo
Denis Velev: Tempo / Antinoo
Luigi De Donato: Nettuno
Rainer Trost: Eumete
Marion Tassou: Melanto
Oleksiy Palchykov: Eurimaco
Alexander Kravets: Giove
Gabriele Rossmanith: Fortuna/Giunone
Peter Galliard: Iro
Viktor Rud: Pisandro

Vaclav Luks: musical director
Orchestra: Collegium 1704

I like this staging a lot! and have already seen it back in May/2015 when she had her month-long Zürich’s debut, though it’s true back then i had *no* clue about the composer/music/Penelope. Essentially the stage is a simple very large white sloping dish, on which Penelope was either being centered and isolated through her sorrow, or twirled around/cornered by the suiters / party-ers. The fragile human (Christophe Dumaux) was stripped to his boxer and tortured, with strings pulled in every which way by the gods and goddesses. Female characters were in generic dresses with heels** while male characters in suit and ties. The exceptions being Ulisse often being shirtless and the suiters with the “<3 Penelope” T-Shirts that ALL OF US (Dehggi, thadieu, Agathe) ALL WANT WANT WANT ❤ . We’ve discussed going to the Hamburg Opera’s shop to order/request.

© Monika Rittershaus

So, the verdict, actually, i’ll let Agathe say something about her impression in the comment section. As for self, ❤ <3. We sat on the right (in all senses) side with Sara Mingardo often ended up in our corner with Ericlea by her side while being chased. Postures! did I mention Mingardo’s postures before? in holding the bow, throwing the dresses.. jumping(!!) on and off tables (i can’t believe she’s doing all these, with helps of course, but on those heels!) . and vocally: ❤ . Actually Penelope has so much sad music to sing through, it was quite enjoyable the rare moments she has defiant music to push back (posture). Strangely enough, through her lamentation and almost the entire evening, the harpsichord (to the left of the conductor) was TOOO LOUD! we wondered if it was our seatings, but Dehggi reported the same thing from quite a different location in the haus. To our astonishment, the harpsichord went kaput in the final scene. And ALLLL ears were perked up to hear SMingardo’s phrasings during the final bit, starting with such a heart-felt collapse (snif). I’m quite prone to heartfelt/devastated collapses for some reasons, when they’re done just at the right moment and you feel the whole weight on Penelope (or Donna Anna in Paris) , snif..

We debated why we heard ALL of her range of emotion & tones & voice & expression so well in the finale, and wondered outloud if we had gotten used finally to the sound in the haus.. but NO, the harpsichord STOPPED! that was it. PLease, for the rest of the run, please turn down the harpsichord when she sings! She doesn’t need it at all, not at that volume that just trampled over her at times.

Ok, am finishing this off now to go hang out some more, so, mainly just starting this as a space for us to return later to discuss, about how much we enjoyed Minerva, both in blazer and in dress, and that we’d like to hear from more her (mezzo Dorottya Láng) . Above is the trailer, and below is the curtain call. It was quite nice seeing the warm reception the cast and orchestra received on the opening night. And oh yes, I’ll try to form some lines of thoughts about the orchestra. I quite like it! but somehow kept thinking how different they are in their phrasings (mainly Vaclav Luks’s way of phrasing) than Alessandrini and Anrea Marcon. Altogether, we’re still talking about it here through our various hopping between cities.. but will return soon to fill the space (i hope) with discussion, as well as enjoying Dehggi’s take whenever it comes.

signing off until the next excursion. please excuse the grammar/spelling errors.. i’m proceeding now to my fresh breakfast bread!

music for the working fighting-with-printer sunday

woke up with Poppea’s creamy tune in my head! and in anticipation of fighting with the big printer in a couple of hours… if successful, I’ll be happy with a gigantic 1,1m x 1,5m poster in hand, else will be doing some scrambling tomorrow in Berkeley, fingers crossed…

But yes, Poppea, creamy…

poor Ottone.

opera dream/wish list

First, the dream-list as it probably will *never* happen.. but you never know..
1. Emmanuelle Haïm conducding (with her orchestra) Monteverdi L’Orfeo *with* Anna Caterina Antonacci singing the title role!! (or I’ll take anybody conducting with La Antonacci singing Orfeo, even in concert version, but as usual with her stage is a must! She has given interviews saying she wanted to sing it, please, some innovative conductors (E.Haïm!) to take on her ideas!)

[One day she would like to sing the male title-role in Monteverdi’s Orfeo. “Why not? This is music that can be interpreted in so many ways. But when I mention the idea to conductors, they don’t like it. They’re just annoyed because they didn’t think of it first.”] Excerpt from this interview

2. Emmanuelle Haïm re-does the entire 2016 Mitridate *but* with Vesselina Kasarova as Farnace!
3. Vesselina Kasarova sings Agrippina, Ariodante, Orphée, and Sesto again (extreme bonus if E.Haïm conducting!)
4. the pairing of Antonacci and Kasarova as Nerone and Poppea (whichever order!!) in Monteverdi’s “L’incoronazione di Poppea”, extreme bonus if Sara Mingardo is Ottone! (hey, it’s a dream list!)
5. The same pair as Sesto and Vitellia! (I’m fine with transposing the music all down to whoever’s range so we can have switches!!)
6. Anja Harteros sings the countess again in Mozart’s Figaro.

Onto the growing wish-list
1. TV broadcast of Agrippina Paris 2003 . The full 2000 Bruxelles version is just made available on tube last September but I find Antonacci singing/portrayal much different and really love the 2003 version more (also by then she was really rocking those lovely shoulders 😉 )
2. Zürich in-haus recording of Agrippina 2009
3. Munich in-haus recording of Alcina 2007 . We have heard so many rumors they *taped* the video but then only released the cd, boo! Here’s a review.
4. Paris in-haus recording of I Capuleti e i montecchi 1996
5. the entire pocket-recording of La Clemenza di Tito Paris 2006
6. Emmanuelle Haïm’s Une Fête Baroque, the 2.5hr TV version, not the extracts with only French singers
7. TV broadcast of Händel’s “Orest” from Komische Oper Berlin 2006 (primarily because i’m absolutely in love with the ending chorus, and i’d like to see Charlotte Hellekant in the white trench coat swinging to the fan and home-made airplane wing again to the tune (sung in German!) of “Bella sorge la speranza”.)
8. Paris Dec 2014 in-haus recording of Nathalie Stutzmann conducting Händel Messiah with Orfeo55 and Sara Mingardo.
9. radio Ö1 broadcast of Gluck Iphigénie en Aulide Nov 2012 from Theater an der Wien (this is more in-line with the recent soprano obsession; not to be confused with “Iphigénie en Tauride” for which there’s a full ARTE HD broadcast in 2015 with Antonacci that i have!)


More to come…
I just recently re-listened to the Wien 2010 Alcina again and realized how really luckly we are that they taped it! Because when I was there there was no talk of any planning… then all of the sudden huge comotion while we lined up during the 3rd performance (btw, the standing-room wait line is fantastic, pure Wiener opera fans of all ages knowing all about the arts and lining and chatting up) and we overheard that they decided at the very last minute to bring in the cameras because of the huuuuuge success the performance was generating! As I didn’t get to see the Munich Alcina this is indeed a rare and very lucky souvenir. And of all the very rare things I’ve managed to scavenge, 3 stood out that i’m extremely glad to have: the Liceu 2006 “Ariodante”, the Paris 2003 “L’incoronazione di Poppea”, and the Dresden 1998 radio broadcast of “I capuleti e i montecchi”.

radio alert

now 18.05GMT, 1405 EST, Vesselina Kasarova sings Monteverdi, and other arias composed for Arianne

“Lasciatemi morire”, snif
text + translation.

and, just another take for variety purpose, what i’ve been listening this past week. it’s from a live performance, her only solo disc! (she gave an interview where she said she wants small venue + seeing audience to communicate with them, and prefers not doing studio recording due to disconnection..) i like both. each gives a different feeling.