music to start the very long weekend

we still have a meeting today at 10am.. not sure how i’m going to make it at all… and then another meeting at 2pm methinks.. whatever.. i’m ready for a very long weekend to just sleep in. and jeah, sorry, if you’re looking for a relief from Sara Mingardo’s discussion, this is the wrong place. Every time i see her live it seems to trigger even more diving in.. Especially now that i’ve learned she’s teaching a lot more baroque singing to young students, and in parallel performing really intimate pieces in small churches scattered in Italy. So, time to continue dwelling in the vault. The night has been spent searching for her pianissimo.. Here, to start the long weekend. It is on my list of the things I’d like to hear SM live in. It’s really nice to have a conductor who can clear out everything for these moments. ❤

There's also a whole playlist here.

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more monteverdi snippet

ok, so i’ve just found out that more people are now taping “live” S.Mingardo’s performances, yay. Wish this thing below is in full.. but snippet is what we’ll settle for now. There’s also this other full thing which I’ve already posted in some comment section, but it never hurts to share again the goodie, and along with it a lovely write up (based on translation).

(Note the video below: the volume is by default mute, you just have to switch it on. also on mobile the vid doesn’t show up, so it’s now linked to the picture above.)


tube vault

more music from the tube vault. yesh, still with Sara Mingardo. She sang a lot of roles in the past, and it’s really just a matter of luck to find the right ones it seems. Am still sooooooo hopeful to find one of her Rinaldo or Cesare, especially when we realize that her voice back in the 90s has quite a ping! it’s quite intense/compact compared to the super warm version now it seems. At first i wonder if it’s an artifact of VHS quality.. but i think we can hear the baroque violins here ok. (Oh, and i found this by search for her name and “Cavalli”).


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I might have to download the whole thing at some point to re-sync the sound.. There’s a whole playlist here. One can also spot a super young Andrea Marcon, Laura Polverelli, and Ivano Zanenghi (theorbo, one of the founders of the Venice Baroque Orchestra if i’m correct…)

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Edit: Success! took a while to merge the thing.. here it is, much less disruption.

il ritorno d’Ulisse, round 2

It has been well documented chez thadieu that often the 2nd round is better than the first, especially with singers who are in their elements. Prior to tonight’s performance it was brought to my attention that a certain critic writing for some big name newspaper in Hamburg only spent the last paragraph of a long review with first mentions of Sara Mingardo on way to writing she was not heard well*. Granted that three of us were at the theater on the opening night and complaining about the loud harpsichord.. yet all heard her very well, I was quite puzzled to hear this report (so was Dehggi). Especially because we were distributed in the hall enough to avoid potential bias due to preferential seatings. Why do I start a report on such a negative note? Because, by the end of this evening’s performance, I’m pretty sure whoever the critic was likely is in need of an ear- and reality-check**.

This report, I’m afraid, might turn into a big Sara Mingardo’s post. The opera of course started out with the fragile human being tormented by the gods and goddesses. Christophe Dumaux had some very delicate phrasings. Soon though, the evening took a quiet and somber turn as drums sprinkled, theorbos lightly strummed, to Penelope staged at center in dark dress, dark glasses, dark veil. Besides the timeless sweeping by Ericlea, all movements ceased. Then a dark voice rose. Personally, I find this entrance significantly more effective when it is done in a more quiet and evolving manner than full-on lament. And that’s what we had tonight. sprinkles of theorbos, and Sara Mingardo phrasing (pining) Monteverdi. Time truly stopped. It was a true marvel hearing how the mood evolves with her, as if she’s doing it on the fly, based on how she/Penelope felt at each evolving moment. Only occasionally i realized “oh, she’s approached the chair here, like last time”, or “oh, she’s throwing the chair there” . Even the simple moment of throwing the chair was spontaneous: Penelope grabbing on, twisting fingers as she built up the tension in the phrasing, then snapped, with the bouncing echo on the floor. The running away from the center, approaching the edge, hand gestures, leaning onto Ericlea, sitting down rocking sadly and melancholically, with a soft painful smile, to

Torna il tranquillo al mare,
torna il zeffiro al prato,
l’aurora mentre al sol fa dolce invito
a un ritorno del dì che è pria partito.
.

😥 .

And the soft pianissimo we were hoping to hear last Sunday? In full display; trailing and ascending ever so slightly as Penelope drifted into the background to the dancing. sniff. It was that kind of an evening. Yours truly was a bit shaken. But the opera does not end with Penelope’s lament. One should not miss it. But if somehow one accidentally did, it’s still completely worth the effort simply to hear the rest of her phrasing. I have it worked out that this is what she does, and if this works for you, it will never go wrong 🙂 . To the critic who apparently couldn’t hear her, i can rebuff today, from row 8, she was heard extremely well. And judging by the loud screams she received during curtain call, the rest of the theater also heard her well.
Interestingly she was exceptionally well heard when standing on the take singing down to us. As far as beam-story goes, that might have been it! I had all her music mentally marked down in head through the evening, every movements now registered, as if to create a long-lasting memory when i replay the radio broadcast.

A final note on Penelope then, before I might proceed to talk about other singers (or not.. it’s getting late and i have to get up at 4am…) The final collapse. My heart did fully dropped, let out an audible gasp with simultaneous jolt. Even when knowing a collapse was coming i was taken by complete surprise when she did. Something about the so precise moment and yet unpredictable. And with it the cascading spill of emotion, to the soft and yet still slightly pained smile

Gli augelletti, cantando,
i rivi mormorando or si rallegrino!


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I regret not having another chance to hear her in this production. it’s currently pouring rain outside and i hope she is not catching a cold from it! because if you’re in town and want to hear one of the world’s best contraltos breathing Monteverdi, you should go hear her live. I have already discussed the orchestra sparingly elsewhere and just wanted to add today, either they had reduced volume greatly during her singing, or perhaps sitting in the floor section blocked out the harpsichord, but i think it (the harpsichord) has toned down significantly.. not sure if this is a welcome trend or that it might pick up again during the weekend.. Also I’m still working my way through Vaclav Luks’s conducting. Personally I prefer a little bit more “rhythm” / pace change to help things flow a tiny bit more musically. Yes yes i know this is Monteverdi, but the continuous similarities can even make this semi hard-core Monteverdi fan flagged at time.. Also, there’s still something about their “thick” accompany that I’m still trying to wrap my head around.. and a tiny note that i prefer Ian Bostridge’s way of phrasing significantly more than Kurt Streit’s.

Edit: curtain call:

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-ps anotehr curtain call coming at some point…
* i can’t voucher yet since it was translatedly summarized to me, and translation can also be rather subjective as it can also highlight the person’s personal intake..
** or rather, as Dehggi and Agathe put it, get the ears trained on contraltos.

il ritorno d’Ulisse in Hamburg

©Monika Rittershaus

warming greetings from Hamburg! The WS vehicle, which Purity envisioned 8 years ago to follow mezzos (and contraltos) around Europe finally materialized as Agathe, thadieu, and Dehggi all piled into to a small 4-wheel device heading for Sara Mingardo.

the Mingardo soundtrack for the WS road


The anticipation was very high, given that the Hamburger Staatsoper withheld any rehearsal photos the entire week prior and we all arrived with heart-thumping worries of an announcement of a replacement. Even the conductor walking out was giving Agathe a heart-dropping moment, same worrying about more last minute announcement :-). But all was well, Sara Mingardo was listed, onstage right from the first scene. Not sure if Agathe recognized her in the ensemble, but of course I did, and so should Dehggi one floor higher up on our opposite side.

Monteverdi’s Il ritorno d’Ulisse in patria

Hamburg 29/Oct/2017
Sara Mingardo: Penelope

Kurt Streit: Ulisse
Katja Pieweck: Ericlea
Dorottya Láng: Minerva
Dovlet Nurgeldiyev: Telemaco
Christophe Dumaux: L’umana fragilità / Anfinomo
Denis Velev: Tempo / Antinoo
Luigi De Donato: Nettuno
Rainer Trost: Eumete
Marion Tassou: Melanto
Oleksiy Palchykov: Eurimaco
Alexander Kravets: Giove
Gabriele Rossmanith: Fortuna/Giunone
Peter Galliard: Iro
Viktor Rud: Pisandro

Vaclav Luks: musical director
Orchestra: Collegium 1704

I like this staging a lot! and have already seen it back in May/2015 when she had her month-long Zürich’s debut, though it’s true back then i had *no* clue about the composer/music/Penelope. Essentially the stage is a simple very large white sloping dish, on which Penelope was either being centered and isolated through her sorrow, or twirled around/cornered by the suiters / party-ers. The fragile human (Christophe Dumaux) was stripped to his boxer and tortured, with strings pulled in every which way by the gods and goddesses. Female characters were in generic dresses with heels** while male characters in suit and ties. The exceptions being Ulisse often being shirtless and the suiters with the “<3 Penelope” T-Shirts that ALL OF US (Dehggi, thadieu, Agathe) ALL WANT WANT WANT ❤ . We’ve discussed going to the Hamburg Opera’s shop to order/request.

© Monika Rittershaus

So, the verdict, actually, i’ll let Agathe say something about her impression in the comment section. As for self, ❤ <3. We sat on the right (in all senses) side with Sara Mingardo often ended up in our corner with Ericlea by her side while being chased. Postures! did I mention Mingardo’s postures before? in holding the bow, throwing the dresses.. jumping(!!) on and off tables (i can’t believe she’s doing all these, with helps of course, but on those heels!) . and vocally: ❤ . Actually Penelope has so much sad music to sing through, it was quite enjoyable the rare moments she has defiant music to push back (posture). Strangely enough, through her lamentation and almost the entire evening, the harpsichord (to the left of the conductor) was TOOO LOUD! we wondered if it was our seatings, but Dehggi reported the same thing from quite a different location in the haus. To our astonishment, the harpsichord went kaput in the final scene. And ALLLL ears were perked up to hear SMingardo’s phrasings during the final bit, starting with such a heart-felt collapse (snif). I’m quite prone to heartfelt/devastated collapses for some reasons, when they’re done just at the right moment and you feel the whole weight on Penelope (or Donna Anna in Paris) , snif..

We debated why we heard ALL of her range of emotion & tones & voice & expression so well in the finale, and wondered outloud if we had gotten used finally to the sound in the haus.. but NO, the harpsichord STOPPED! that was it. PLease, for the rest of the run, please turn down the harpsichord when she sings! She doesn’t need it at all, not at that volume that just trampled over her at times.

Ok, am finishing this off now to go hang out some more, so, mainly just starting this as a space for us to return later to discuss, about how much we enjoyed Minerva, both in blazer and in dress, and that we’d like to hear from more her (mezzo Dorottya Láng) . Above is the trailer, and below is the curtain call. It was quite nice seeing the warm reception the cast and orchestra received on the opening night. And oh yes, I’ll try to form some lines of thoughts about the orchestra. I quite like it! but somehow kept thinking how different they are in their phrasings (mainly Vaclav Luks’s way of phrasing) than Alessandrini and Anrea Marcon. Altogether, we’re still talking about it here through our various hopping between cities.. but will return soon to fill the space (i hope) with discussion, as well as enjoying Dehggi’s take whenever it comes.

signing off until the next excursion. please excuse the grammar/spelling errors.. i’m proceeding now to my fresh breakfast bread!

outside the box

ok, i was looking for a long opera with Sara Mingardo to start the working evening.. and First ran into this (with Dick Tracy & Superman (see pix on left from the program note) & TinTin & Snoopy & the Duponts and… and S.Mingardo singing Jessica Rabbit… all in English!).. and was going to attempt to “settle” with that for music.. and then off the corner of eye was this other suggestion… she does sing!! (not sure in which language.., i think the opera is in English.) , starting around minute 4.. , but first some acting.. one of those other female characters is apparently sung/danced by Barbara Hanningen …

Here, amusement for the late evening / very early morning of a new week:

music for Dorilla debugging


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Ah, ch’infelice sempre
mi vuol Dorilla ingrata,
ah, sempre più spietata m’astringe a lagrimar.

Per me non v’è ristoro,
per me non v’è più spene.
E il fier martoro e le mie pene,
solo la morte può consolar.

Ah, ungrateful Dorilla
wants me to continue suffering;
ah, always more unmercifully she induces my tears.

For me there is no cure,
for me no more hope.
Only death will quench my pain and sadness.